Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) was a British Baptist pastor and founder of the world’s first mega-church. For over 40 years vast crowds gathered at London’s Metropolitan Tabernacle to hear him speak. Spurgeon preached to a total of 10 million people in his lifetime, and his sermons were typeset, printed and sold throughout the English-speaking world. If that output of thousands of sermons isn’t voluminous enough, Spurgeon spent his off-days writing Biblical commentaries, study guides, daily devotionals and works of Christian theology, many of which are still in print. Spurgeon’s direct style and emphasis on personal spiritual growth made him famous as a pastor, but he did more than just preach. He put his words into practice by founding Sunday schools, churches, an orphanage and a Pastor’s College. He edited a magazine, "The Sword and the Trowel," and wrote many articles and books to help fellow pastors construct effective sermons. His magnum opus, "The Treasury of David," explicates and meditates on each of the Psalms and is still used by pastors worldwide. Among Spurgeon’s most enduring works are his books of daily devotionals, "Morning by Morning" and "Evening by Evening." In these two famous works Spurgeon offers daily devotionals on Biblical texts and challenges readers to apply the lessons of scripture to their own lives. These two books have served as guideposts to generations of Christians seeking deeper meaning within the scriptures, and offer daily opportunities to pause, reflect and listen to God’s voice in a busy world. Spurgeon’s penetrating sermons and powerful oratory held vast crowds of listeners spellbound in his day, and he is regarded as one of the strongest thinkers and writers in recent Christian literature. His works continue to provide invaluable insights into a great spiritual mind and are used as models by countless pastors and preachers. Reading the “Prince of Preachers” provides a great practical resource for spiritual growth, personal witnessing and Christian study.

Around the Wicket Gate

The “wicket gate” of this small volume’s title will be familiar to readers of John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress. That work refers to the “narrow gate” through which all Christians must pass on their way to salvation (Matt. 7:13-14). The “seekers” of the book’s subtitle are those who have heard the message of salvation—perhaps have Continue Reading...

Life and Works of Rev. Charles H. Spurgeon

This in-depth account of the life of the Reformed Baptist pastor is a fantastic resource for studying one of the greatest preachers of the 19th century. The book covers Spurgeon’s adolescence, pastorship at the New Park Street Chapel, growing popularity as he preached to vast audiences at the famed Crystal Palace, the construction of the Continue Reading...

Morning by Morning; or, Daily Readings

This beloved book has been the guidepost for generations of Christians since its publication more than a century ago. Spurgeon’s famous book of scripture readings and devotionals (one for each day of the year) offers counsel and support through the trials of life. Let Spurgeon’s elegant meditations, never too long but always full of wisdom Continue Reading...

Commenting and Commentaries

Spurgeon’s classic lecture series is paired with a carefully annotated catalogue of Biblical commentaries available in his day. This book is invaluable both to students of the Bible and pastors looking to expand their library of scriptural reference works. Spurgeon lists commentaries of specific Biblical books as well as the whole Bible—many of which are Continue Reading...

Talks to Farmers

Despite increasing industrialization, most of Spurgeon’s 19th-century listeners were connected in some way to the soil. Rural themes, concerns and metaphors ruled British life, even among urban Londoners. This book offers a collection of Spurgeon’s sermons that draw their themes from farming and rural life. In preaching from agricultural metaphors, Spurgeon emulated the ministry of Continue Reading...

Sermons in Candles

Spurgeon is famed for his ability to find illustrations for high spiritual concepts in the most commonplace of objects and experiences. As Spurgeon himself wrote, “A sermon without illustrations is like a room without windows.” In this volume of lectures Spurgeon uses candles, an everyday household item in Victorian Britain, to draw out an increasingly Continue Reading...